So, yes, I’m scrolling through the trending news and sales, making my usual random (judgmental) comments on the absurdity of rushing out to buy things…material things…until I read that Apple had joined the ranks and dropped their prices for one day!

Can you believe that?

Of course, I immediately jumped up, rushed out, realized it was freezing cold, rushed back in, went out and…just kidding! But we do need a new computer. Somehow, we’ve managed to kill two of them.

Anyway, I remember what the Guardian called this sacred day—the “annual ‘Black Friday’ orgy of consumerism!”

Shoppers in the US kicked off their annual ‘Black Friday’ orgy of consumerism amid scenes of pushing, pulling, running and—in one case—pepper-spraying their way through the doors of the nation’s shops and malls.
–The Guardian, UK

That seems an apt summary of our obsession for shopping on the day after Thanksgiving. Someone I love dearly refers to it as his idea of hell! But back to camping out the night before, standing in lines, beating up on other people (often literally), grabbing things from under their nose. Do we really need to spend our day off like this?

I understand that the economy has hit us hard, but most of the items people are fighting to buy are usually things that further take away from spending time together or with others.

Compare this scenario to what for Christians is the real Black Friday—Good Friday, according to a traditional view of the day when Jesus was crucified. What a difference! Years ago on that Friday, it seemed like all was lost, and back to our Big Savings Day, when we think we’ve gained, but have lost more than we realize. Jesus forgives our debts, while Black Friday increases them—no real saving there.

This is not a guilt trip. Okay, it’s a bit of a guilt trip. I’m not saying that it’s wrong to try and save money and get a good deal. I love a great sale. It just seems the desire, the necessity, the addiction to getting, not necessarily the best, but the trendiest deal will probably not pan out as hoped. How does this help our children? I’ve found that many of the bargains that I thought really mattered didn’t count all that much. They much prefer that I hang out and spend time with them.

So this Black Friday will find me at home, relaxing with my loved ones, spending time hassling them (and my friends on Twitter, too!). Above all, heartily thanking God for all his blessings and focusing on the things that really do count, not just temporarily, but beyond.

Ultimately, for us, the only real and lasting deal is what Jesus did for us on the cross and it’s the best news we can share with an increasingly dark and gloomy world. Don’t you think?

 

Photo by Powhusku via Wikipedia